Series of candid portraits of New Yorkers. With these pictures I'm trying to capture those little oddities of the everyday life. A little bit of drama and that dark side that is in everyone of us.   Photo selected by  Bruce Gilden  for  Streetwise  exhibition at the  Darkroom Gallery,  opening May 25th, 2017.  Featured in Lensculture:  Emerging from the Dark
       
     
 3rd Place: On The Street Photo Competition -  Fabrik’s Magazine #36 2017
       
     
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 My photos are tied to the people and their environment, their movements and emotions, I'm interested on those little quirks that connect us as humans. It's that sort of mundane daily things I want to document, and slowly it became a daily routine for me. It make the world a little closer, especially in New York City.
       
     
       
     
 Tromsø Wilderness Centre. We started out as a home for dogs in 1988, since then our passion for dogs and life in the nature has taken us on an exhilarating journey. Our family run business was set up by  Tove Sørensen who has over 20 years experience with dog sledding and has competed 19 times in the Europe’s longest dog sledding race – Finnmarksløpet.
       
     
 Soweto is the most populous black urban residential area in South Africa, with Census 2001 putting its population at close to a million. Thanks to its proximity to Johannesburg, the economic hub of the country, it is also the most metropolitan township in the country – setting trends in politics, fashion, music, dance and language.
       
     
 To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don't grab hold of the water, because if you do you will sink and drown. Instead you relax, and float.  (Alan Watts)  
       
     
 I woke up as the sun was reddening; and that was the one distinct time in my life, the strangest moment of all, when I didn’t know who I was – I was far away from home, haunted and tired with travel, in a cheap hotel room I’d never seen, hearing the hiss of steam outside, and the creak of the old wood of the hotel, and footsteps upstairs, and all the sad sounds, and I looked at the cracked high ceiling and really didn’t know who I was for about fifteen strange seconds. I wasn’t scared; I was just somebody else, some stranger, and my whole life was a haunted life, the life of a ghost. (Jack Kerouac)
       
     
 The Po Valley, Po Plain, Plain of the Po, or Padan Plain (Italian: Pianura Padana, or Val Padana) is a major geographical feature of Italy. It extends approximately 650 km (400 mi) in an east-west direction, with an area of 46,000 square kilometres (18,000 sq mi) including its Venetic extension not actually related to the Po river basin; it runs from the Western Alps to the Adriatic Sea. The flatlands of Veneto and Friuli are often considered apart since they do not drain into the Po, but they effectively combine into an unbroken plain.
       
     
 The Sassi originate from a prehistoric troglodyte settlement and are suspected to be among the first human settlements in Italy. There is evidence that people were living here as early as the year 7000 BC.  The Sassi are houses dug into the calcarenitic rock itself, which is characteristic of Basilicata and Apulia, locally called "tufo" although it is not volcanic tuff or tufa. The streets in some parts of the Sassi often run on top of other houses. The ancient town grew up on one slope of the ravine created by a river that is now a small stream. The ravine is known locally as "la Gravina". In the 1950s, the government of Italy forcefully relocated most of the population of the Sassi to areas of the developing modern city. 
       
     
 A selection of Portraits on Assignment I did over the last few years.
       
     
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